Category: Media information

Steven Kane Developing New Series at Paramount Network

It has just been announced that RMG client Steven Kane, co-creator and showrunner of TNT’s hit series The Last Ship, is currently developing a new show at Paramount Network. Entitled I Know Who You Are, the show is an adaptation of the Spanish limited series Sé quién eres.

Helpful Post-Holiday “How To” From Client Adam Richman

Maxim Magazine’s first issue of the new year features food host and enthusiast Adam Richman.

Notorious for his love affair with food, Adam will teach you how to prepare a delicious cure for your New Years Day hangover.

Simon Majumdar hosts on the Cooking Channel, Thanksgiving Style.

Join RMG client Simon Majumdar on a culinary journey through the dishes that kicked off America’s favorite food tradition.

Simon will show us how to make Sobaheg, a stew that was served at the first Thanksgiving meal. Tune in Sunday, November 4th at 8pm ET.

http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/back-in-time-for-thanksgiving/index.html

The Connection Between Hollywood and the Internet

Every day we hear about the power of social media, how it is a revolution in process that shapes our point of view.  Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, My Space, IAC corporation, and Tumblr all barely existed a decade ago, and now rule the world.  As individuals we all have “friends/fans” who follow our every move.  Celebrities like Ashton, Ellen, and Ryan Seacrest have millions of fans, are perceived as influencers, and essentially the social media version of broadcasters.  However, much like cable networks who “narrowcast” there is  a tremendous opportunity in the social media space to do the same as indicated in the following article which we at RAIN found incredibly insightful.

Enjoy!

“THE NEXUS OF HOLLYWOOD AND THE INTERNET”, by Mark Borden for Fast Company

olivia-munn-supeheroAshton. Oprah. Britney. Martha. The single-name celebrities in the offline world who have parlayed their fame into huge followings online is no secret. But other entertainers are using social media to amplify a Web following to match their allure in the traditional arenas of film and TV. While smaller in scale, these online audiences are often more committed and extend a personality’s reach into the most distant nodes of the Internet. When nurtured, the cyber connection creates a symbiotic relationship that takes the combined parts of the online and offline worlds and presents an exponentially more influential whole.

Olivia Munn is the former host of video-game channel G4’s Attack of The Show and the author of Suck It, Wonder Woman!: The Misadventures of a Hollywood Geek (co-written by Fast Company contributor Mac Montandon). She has a regular role in the new NBC sitcom Perfect Couples and also appeared in Iron Man 2, Date Night, on NBC’s Chuck, and hosted Microsoft’s Bing-a-thon launch on Hulu. In July, Munn started her job as the Senior Asian Correspondent on The Daily Show.

And she has 172,000 rabid Twitter followers.

I talked to Munn about the cyber migration that is growing in Hollywood.

“I recently had a friend of mine, a known actress, call me and say, ‘I need you to help me get what you have,” says Munn as she tools around her Los Angeles home. “And then she made sure I was perfectly clear on what she wanted, ‘The Internet thing. I need you to help me get that.'”

At first, Munn didn’t realize the power her online following gave her. Last year, she signed on as a spokesperson for the new Volkswagen GTI, and at a launch event VW reps asked her if she could help make the GTI a trending topic on Twitter. “I’ve never tried to trend anything on Twitter, ever,” she recalls. “It creates anxiety for me, it’s like, if I throw a party, will anybody come? I mean, I feel embarrassed when friends of mine go # and the name of their show and it doesn’t trend. I’m like Dude, I can see that it’s not trending, everybody can.”

But she reluctantly agreed. “In my head I’m like, ‘I’m paid to be here. That’s enough right? Now they want me to Twitter? It’s going to be so embarrassing.’ But they were really nice, and I always want to do a good job. So my tweet was something like, ‘Hey guys, I’ve never done this before, but can we try to trend this?’ It was very honest, me talking to them. Not like, ‘Hey guys, what’s up? It’s so fuckin’ awesome. I love this car!'”

Thanks to Munn’s nudge, the GTI became the No. 6 trending topic for the day. “I thought about that for days,” says Munn. “Holy shit, how did that work? While some people might have a million followers, they’re just following them. With me, I guess, they’re true blue fans and friends and people that support me. So when I address them, I’m reaching out to them specifically.”

As for her actress friend with the Internet ambitions, “I told her, I can create a blog for you and get you onto Facebook. We can get you onto Twitter, get the whole library ready. But there’s an intangible that you can’t buy and I can’t teach. People on the Internet see through any dishonesty. So if your intention is, ‘I want to get what you have. I want them to be my fans,’ they’ll never be your fans. Because they can feel that you’re trying to use them.”

What Exactly are the Upfronts?

The Upfronts are a critical aspect of the entertainment industry. It is aptly titled the Upfronts because it is a meeting held during important advertising sales periods that is hosted by television broadcast network executives and attended by the press and major advertisers. The main purpose of the Upfronts is to allow advertisers and marketers an opportunity to purchase airtime for their advertisements “upfront” generally several months before the show is actually scheduled to air. In the United States, the Upfronts occur in New York City during the third week of May, which is also the last full week of the sweeps period. This is also an opportunity for the major networks to unveil their fall primetime schedules including tentative launch dates for new programming, as well as discussing each of their positions in the television marketplace.

Both industry insiders and outsiders alike covet this period. For the average fan, this period is when they find out if their favorite shows have been renewed and are going to return in the upcoming fall, or sadly if they’ve been cancelled. Experienced industry professionals know that this is an opportunity to get media buyers/advertisers to spend critical dollars to push out their brands. The networks leverage their shows created by perceived hitmakers to grab more ad dollars.

Meanwhile, back in Hollywood the network, studio executives, producers, and creators of these new shows are meeting with writers and other creative’s to bring on to their shows to help guarantee their future success. The attached link gives a preview of the 2010 Upfronts http://www.thewrap.com/ind-column/upfronts-preview-nets-poised-take-9b-17242

Hope this was helpful and see you in The Big Apple!

Life lessons from Google

Do what you love and the money will follow.  If ever there were a company that embodied this point of view we at RAIN would have to say the folks that started GOOGLE get a big fat A+.  With a clear passion, focus, and vision GOOGLE has redefined our world.

googled

10 things Google has taught us
What makes it so revolutionary? Ken Auletta, author of a new book on the company, shares his insights on why it’s uniquely successful and what that means for the media world
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By Ken Auletta, contributor
October 26, 2009: 9:28 AM ET
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NEW YORK (Fortune) — In researching his new book, Googled: the End of the World as We Know It, to be published next week by Penguin Press, author Ken Auletta had extensive access to the company’s inner workings and reported widely on its impact on the media landscape.
In a Fortune.com exclusive, he offers ten enduring lessons drawn from his journey into Google’s realm:
1.) Passion wins
Start with the words of advice — “Don’t settle” — that Larry Page offered the Stanford graduating class in 2002. This intensity was revealed in the zeal with which he and Sergey Brin inspired the entire company to “serve the user,” to take more risks, to radically improve search.
Or as CEO Eric Schmidt told me: while he assumed that “Google would be an important company; the founders always assumed that Google would be a defining company.”
A moment after venture capitalist Michael Moritz finished describing Google as “a rare” company, I asked Moritz, an early investor in both Yahoo and Google (GOOG, Fortune 500), whether he felt the same enthusiasm for Yahoo (YHOO, Fortune 500).
He winced, hesitated, then finally said: “Yahoo is a company I’ve been close to for a long time and feel a lot of affection and loyalty towards. But within the first 18 months to two years of being associated with Google, I began to understand this was a very different company than Yahoo. It was rooted in the studies of the founders. Google was built on a foundation of Larry’s and Sergey’s intellectual pursuits. Yahoo was built on the foundations of Jerry’s and David’s interests. And there’s a big gulf between those two.”
That deficit of passion, he suggested, was a reason that Jerry Yang and David Filo chose not to be fully engaged full-time with the company they created.
0:00 /2:30Google execs top 40 under 40 list
2.) Focus is required
Passion without focus can lead you astray. Bill Campbell, chairman of Intuit and a Silicon Valley mentor who spends a couple of days each week at Google, thinks the key to Google’s success is “focused passion.” He credits Schmidt for bringing a focus to the founders.
In an interview with Betsy Morris of Fortune, Steve Jobs offered an interesting and, typically, upside-down perspective on focus: “People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the 100 other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the many things we haven’t done as the things we have done.”
Media mogul Barry Diller, who had an unsettling session with Page and Brin in the early days of Google, when Page would not look up from his PDA to talk to him, now thinks what might be construed as rudeness was really focus.
“They had their own method of communicating and processing,” Diller said. “They give much less quarter than other people do to common business courtesies. They’ve stayed true to this. It’s a spectacular strength. It means you never get de-focused by the crowd.”
3.) Vision is required too
Without vision, even the most focused passion is a battery without a device. “Don’t be evil” is a vague incantation. But Page and Brin’s effort to make “all the world’s information available,”and to first and foremost serve users, is a vision.
It’s one that successfully drove Google to index the Web, make news and books searchable, treat ads as information and to reject dollars if the ads were not “relevant,” help users search for the best or cheapest products, find simple travel directions, store and search their e-mail, and share calendar information.
Such a vision does not come from survey research. In his 2005 speech to graduating engineers at the University of Michigan, Page told them they didn’t have to go to business school. He said he had read an entire shelf of business books when he was younger, and among the lessons he learned was that “many of the amazing insights that happen in business actually come from people who really aren’t in the business.”
4.) A team culture is vital
Google’s allocation of 20% of employee time to projects of their own choice give them a sense of proprietorship. True to its open-source, wisdom-of-the-crowd ideals, Google has created a networked management that functions from the bottom-up as well as the top-down. In both directions, it unleashes ideas and effort.
As Larry Page astutely observes: “There is a pattern in companies, even in technological companies, that the people who do the work — the engineers, the programmers, the foot soldiers if you will — typically get rolled over by the management … you end up kind of demoralized. You want to have a culture where the people who are doing the work, the scientists and the engineers, are empowered. And that they are managed by people who deeply understand what they are doing.”
5.) Treat engineers as kings
For most Valley companies, engineers are the equivalent of the television writer, the movie director, the book author. They are the creators. The 20% time Google grants its engineers gives them a sense that they are liberated to take risks, to follow their passions.
Innovation, as Bill Campbell told The McKinsey Quarterly, comes when “the crazy guys have stature, where engineers really are important…. empowered engineers are the single most important thing that you can have in a company.”
It is no accident that Page and Brin and Schmidt spend so many hours each week in meetings with engineers. For most traditional media companies, the engineer is less central.
However, as digital is now part of the mainstream, and as older media companies struggle to master its challenges, they would do well to heed the advice Google’s David Eun offers: Don’t do what these companies traditionally do and stick “the geeks in a corner.” Instead, CEO’s should have at their elbow “a top Chief Technical Officer.”
6.) Treat customers like a king
An important reason Google is usually listed among the world’s most trusted brands is that it conveys a sense that the user comes first. Advertising may produce 97% of Google’s revenues, but to a user it doesn’t feel that way. Google services are free, and they’re user friendly, just as an iPod is.
The lessons Larry Page took away from reading Donald A. Norman’s The Design of Everyday Things while a graduate student at Stanford, helped shape Google’s approach to its customers. Or as Page said, “Having an attitude that your customer or users are always right, and your goal is to build systems that work for them in a natural way, is a good attitude to have.”
To understand how Google earned the trust of its users, go back to its 2004 IPO. Again and again it referred to the users as sacrosanct: “We believe that our user focus is the foundation of our success to date. We also believe that this focus is critical for the creation of long-term value. We do not intend to compromise our user focus for short-term economic gain.”
By focusing on the user, Page and Brin provided an organizing principle for Google employees that echoed Sam Walton’s adage: ” ‘If you don’t listen to your customers, someone else will.'”
7.) Every company is a frenemy
What Lord Palmerston said of nations applies as well to corporations: There are no permanent allies, only permanent interests. A medium like the internet blurs the borders between companies, sometimes making it more difficult to sight a potential rival or to distinguish between ally and foe.
Google started as a search engine, but quickly realized it could efficiently sell ads or aggregate news or search books or use its infrastructure to create cloud computing or expand into video by acquiring YouTube or expand into mobile devices.
At the same time, Google’s AdSense helps newspapers by supplying them with ad dollars; AdWords partners with ad agencies to sell products; YouTube is a coveted promotional platform for the television networks; Android software supplies an operating system for more than a few mobile telephone companies.
These horizontal ambitions, coupled with the fears aroused by the speed of technological change, inevitably frays the bond of trust among companies. Most companies become frenemies, both cooperating and competing.
8.) Don’t ignore the human factor
As a journalist, the deeper one burrows, the more complicated narratives and the people who populate them usually become. Among the enduring truths I keep bumping into when there is the luxury of time to get to know people or institutions, is that their decisions are often made for what are not, strictly speaking, reasons of logic. These can be ascribed to human factors. How to measure wisdom, judgment, sensitivity, relationships?
Google has been wise in winning the trust of its users, in building a team culture, and in thinking long-term. But when you start from a blanket assumption that the old ways of doing things are probably wrong, as Google does, you’re bound to make unwise mistakes.
Page was unwise to assume Google could immediately digitize all books, just as Google was wrong to assume that it could devise formulas to better sell ads for newspapers and broadcast radio, two efforts it has since abandoned. Google has not always been wise in avoiding battles, in being insensitive to copyright, or privacy, or the concerns of government.
9.) There are no certitudes
Today, Google appears impregnable. But a decade ago so did AOL, and so did the combination of AOL Time Warner.
“There is nothing about their model that makes them invulnerable,” Clayton Christensen, the Harvard business historian and author of the seminal, The Innovators Dilemma, told me. “Think IBM. They had a 70% market share of mainframe computers. Then the government decided to challenge them. Then the PC emerged.”
Seemingly overnight, computing moved from mainframes to PCs. “Lots of companies are successful and are applauded by the financial community,” Christensen said. “Then their stock price stalls because they are no longer surprising investors with their growth. So they strive to grow but forget the principles that made them great — getting into the market quickly, not throwing money at the wrong thing. When you have so much money you become so patient that you wait too long. Look at Microsoft. No one can fault them for not investing in growth ideas. But none of these have grown up to be the next Windows.”
Maybe, Christensen added, we are now beginning to “see this at Google.” The company has poured money into YouTube and Android and cloud computing, but has yet “to figure out the business model for each.”
10.) “Life is long but time is short.”
The words belong to Eric Schmidt, who explained: “Life is long in the sense that we have long memories. Time is short in that you have to move very quickly. But to me the most important thing to know is that life has a way of working things out. We forget so quickly what the problem was three or four years ago. So my personal view of life is that every problem is an opportunity.”
This is a reason to think and act boldly, as Google has, to take risks, and not to be anchored down by “long memories.” To top of page
Obama & Google (a love story)
10 things Google has taught us
What makes it so revolutionary? Ken Auletta, author of a new book on the company, shares his insights on why it’s uniquely successful and what that means for the media world
NEW YORK (Fortune) — In researching his new book, Googled: the End of the World as We Know It, to be published next week by Penguin Press, author Ken Auletta had extensive access to the company’s inner workings and reported widely on its impact on the media landscape.
In a Fortune.com exclusive, he offers ten enduring lessons drawn from his journey into Google’s realm:
1.) Passion wins
Start with the words of advice — “Don’t settle” — that Larry Page offered the Stanford graduating class in 2002. This intensity was revealed in the zeal with which he and Sergey Brin inspired the entire company to “serve the user,” to take more risks, to radically improve search.
Or as CEO Eric Schmidt told me: while he assumed that “Google would be an important company; the founders always assumed that Google would be a defining company.”
A moment after venture capitalist Michael Moritz finished describing Google as “a rare” company, I asked Moritz, an early investor in both Yahoo and Google (GOOG, Fortune 500), whether he felt the same enthusiasm for Yahoo (YHOO, Fortune 500).
He winced, hesitated, then finally said: “Yahoo is a company I’ve been close to for a long time and feel a lot of affection and loyalty towards. But within the first 18 months to two years of being associated with Google, I began to understand this was a very different company than Yahoo. It was rooted in the studies of the founders. Google was built on a foundation of Larry’s and Sergey’s intellectual pursuits. Yahoo was built on the foundations of Jerry’s and David’s interests. And there’s a big gulf between those two.”
That deficit of passion, he suggested, was a reason that Jerry Yang and David Filo chose not to be fully engaged full-time with the company they created.
0:00 /2:30Google execs top 40 under 40 list
2.) Focus is required
Passion without focus can lead you astray. Bill Campbell, chairman of Intuit and a Silicon Valley mentor who spends a couple of days each week at Google, thinks the key to Google’s success is “focused passion.” He credits Schmidt for bringing a focus to the founders.
In an interview with Betsy Morris of Fortune, Steve Jobs offered an interesting and, typically, upside-down perspective on focus: “People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the 100 other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the many things we haven’t done as the things we have done.”
Media mogul Barry Diller, who had an unsettling session with Page and Brin in the early days of Google, when Page would not look up from his PDA to talk to him, now thinks what might be construed as rudeness was really focus.
“They had their own method of communicating and processing,” Diller said. “They give much less quarter than other people do to common business courtesies. They’ve stayed true to this. It’s a spectacular strength. It means you never get de-focused by the crowd.”
3.) Vision is required too
Without vision, even the most focused passion is a battery without a device. “Don’t be evil” is a vague incantation. But Page and Brin’s effort to make “all the world’s information available,”and to first and foremost serve users, is a vision.
It’s one that successfully drove Google to index the Web, make news and books searchable, treat ads as information and to reject dollars if the ads were not “relevant,” help users search for the best or cheapest products, find simple travel directions, store and search their e-mail, and share calendar information.
Such a vision does not come from survey research. In his 2005 speech to graduating engineers at the University of Michigan, Page told them they didn’t have to go to business school. He said he had read an entire shelf of business books when he was younger, and among the lessons he learned was that “many of the amazing insights that happen in business actually come from people who really aren’t in the business.”
4.) A team culture is vital
Google’s allocation of 20% of employee time to projects of their own choice give them a sense of proprietorship. True to its open-source, wisdom-of-the-crowd ideals, Google has created a networked management that functions from the bottom-up as well as the top-down. In both directions, it unleashes ideas and effort.
As Larry Page astutely observes: “There is a pattern in companies, even in technological companies, that the people who do the work — the engineers, the programmers, the foot soldiers if you will — typically get rolled over by the management … you end up kind of demoralized. You want to have a culture where the people who are doing the work, the scientists and the engineers, are empowered. And that they are managed by people who deeply understand what they are doing.”
5.) Treat engineers as kings
For most Valley companies, engineers are the equivalent of the television writer, the movie director, the book author. They are the creators. The 20% time Google grants its engineers gives them a sense that they are liberated to take risks, to follow their passions.
Innovation, as Bill Campbell told The McKinsey Quarterly, comes when “the crazy guys have stature, where engineers really are important…. empowered engineers are the single most important thing that you can have in a company.”
It is no accident that Page and Brin and Schmidt spend so many hours each week in meetings with engineers. For most traditional media companies, the engineer is less central.
However, as digital is now part of the mainstream, and as older media companies struggle to master its challenges, they would do well to heed the advice Google’s David Eun offers: Don’t do what these companies traditionally do and stick “the geeks in a corner.” Instead, CEO’s should have at their elbow “a top Chief Technical Officer.”
6.) Treat customers like a king
An important reason Google is usually listed among the world’s most trusted brands is that it conveys a sense that the user comes first. Advertising may produce 97% of Google’s revenues, but to a user it doesn’t feel that way. Google services are free, and they’re user friendly, just as an iPod is.
The lessons Larry Page took away from reading Donald A. Norman’s The Design of Everyday Things while a graduate student at Stanford, helped shape Google’s approach to its customers. Or as Page said, “Having an attitude that your customer or users are always right, and your goal is to build systems that work for them in a natural way, is a good attitude to have.”
To understand how Google earned the trust of its users, go back to its 2004 IPO. Again and again it referred to the users as sacrosanct: “We believe that our user focus is the foundation of our success to date. We also believe that this focus is critical for the creation of long-term value. We do not intend to compromise our user focus for short-term economic gain.”
By focusing on the user, Page and Brin provided an organizing principle for Google employees that echoed Sam Walton’s adage: ” ‘If you don’t listen to your customers, someone else will.'”
7.) Every company is a frenemy
What Lord Palmerston said of nations applies as well to corporations: There are no permanent allies, only permanent interests. A medium like the internet blurs the borders between companies, sometimes making it more difficult to sight a potential rival or to distinguish between ally and foe.
Google started as a search engine, but quickly realized it could efficiently sell ads or aggregate news or search books or use its infrastructure to create cloud computing or expand into video by acquiring YouTube or expand into mobile devices.
At the same time, Google’s AdSense helps newspapers by supplying them with ad dollars; AdWords partners with ad agencies to sell products; YouTube is a coveted promotional platform for the television networks; Android software supplies an operating system for more than a few mobile telephone companies.
These horizontal ambitions, coupled with the fears aroused by the speed of technological change, inevitably frays the bond of trust among companies. Most companies become frenemies, both cooperating and competing.
8.) Don’t ignore the human factor
As a journalist, the deeper one burrows, the more complicated narratives and the people who populate them usually become. Among the enduring truths I keep bumping into when there is the luxury of time to get to know people or institutions, is that their decisions are often made for what are not, strictly speaking, reasons of logic. These can be ascribed to human factors. How to measure wisdom, judgment, sensitivity, relationships?
Google has been wise in winning the trust of its users, in building a team culture, and in thinking long-term. But when you start from a blanket assumption that the old ways of doing things are probably wrong, as Google does, you’re bound to make unwise mistakes.
Page was unwise to assume Google could immediately digitize all books, just as Google was wrong to assume that it could devise formulas to better sell ads for newspapers and broadcast radio, two efforts it has since abandoned. Google has not always been wise in avoiding battles, in being insensitive to copyright, or privacy, or the concerns of government.
9.) There are no certitudes
Today, Google appears impregnable. But a decade ago so did AOL, and so did the combination of AOL Time Warner.
“There is nothing about their model that makes them invulnerable,” Clayton Christensen, the Harvard business historian and author of the seminal, The Innovators Dilemma, told me. “Think IBM. They had a 70% market share of mainframe computers. Then the government decided to challenge them. Then the PC emerged.”
Seemingly overnight, computing moved from mainframes to PCs. “Lots of companies are successful and are applauded by the financial community,” Christensen said. “Then their stock price stalls because they are no longer surprising investors with their growth. So they strive to grow but forget the principles that made them great — getting into the market quickly, not throwing money at the wrong thing. When you have so much money you become so patient that you wait too long. Look at Microsoft. No one can fault them for not investing in growth ideas. But none of these have grown up to be the next Windows.”
Maybe, Christensen added, we are now beginning to “see this at Google.” The company has poured money into YouTube and Android and cloud computing, but has yet “to figure out the business model for each.”
10.) “Life is long but time is short.”
The words belong to Eric Schmidt, who explained: “Life is long in the sense that we have long memories. Time is short in that you have to move very quickly. But to me the most important thing to know is that life has a way of working things out. We forget so quickly what the problem was three or four years ago. So my personal view of life is that every problem is an opportunity.”
This is a reason to think and act boldly, as Google has, to take risks, and not to be anchored down by “long memories.”

Fast Company's Most Innovative Companies 2010

news_fastcompanyWe at Rain Management Group are always trying to keep in touch with company’s that are changing our business.  These organizations are constantly pushing and challenging all of us as we try to make great content and embrace the new technology that allows us to platform this content.  Our clients are quick to adapt, and that is why they continue to excel in our business.  Below are selected links to FAST COMPANY’S 2010 most innovative companies.  It’s great to see company’s like HULU, NETFLIX, SPOTIFY, DISNEY all in the top 20.  To us this is a sign that our business while heading in a new direction is thriving, and creating new opportunities for all of us.

http://www.fastcompany.com/mic/2010/profile/hulu

http://www.fastcompany.com/mic/2010/profile/netflix

http://www.fastcompany.com/mic/2010/profile/spotify

http://www.fastcompany.com/mic/2010/profile/disney

Stewart Butterfield on 'Glitch', Flickr, and Social Media Integration

butterfield

This recent article from Mashable features Flickr’s co-founder Stewart Butterfield explaining his ambitious new online game – “Glitch”:

Flickr co-founder Stewart Butterfield and five other former Flickr employees are joined by one Digg alum, one games expert and several freelancers in Tiny Speck, a company that’s working on an online game that has a shot at rebooting the stagnating massively multiplayer online game genre.

The 2D game — called Glitch — incorporates beautiful illustrations and cutting edge game mechanics, but its most interesting features are its social aspirations and the lessons it learns from the web that its founders mastered at their previous gigs.  (By Samuel Axon)

To read the entire article, please click the link HERE.

The Information Divide Between Traditional And New Media

At Rain we are always trying to stay current with respect to the merging of traditional and new media.  As new technologies continue to emerge how will we define the difference between the two?  Will today’s “new media” be tomorrow’s “traditional media”?  The attached article  by Brian Solis from www.Paidcontent.org is something we would like to share with our clients and friends.  We hope you will find it helpful.

mind-the-gap-s

In the era of the real-time web, information travels at a greater velocity than the infrastructure of mainstream media can support as it exists today. As events materialize, the access to social publishing and syndication platforms propels information across attentive and connected nodes that link social graphs all over the world. Current events are now at the epicenter of global attention as social media makes the world a much smaller place.

It’s a timely subject as Clay Shirky will discuss how social media can make history at this year’s TED conference. Indeed social media is changing, documenting, and also making history, revolutionizing once invincible industries that are now paralyzed by confusion, fear, and ignorance. Although they’re reacting now, it will take more than the iPad, Kindle, Nook and other digital readers to revitalize the business of media.  PLEASE CLICK ON LINK BELOW FOR FULL ARTICLE

www.paidcontent.org