Category: Broadway and Theatre News

David Ingber Premiers New Musical

We are pleased to announce that RMG client DAVID INGBER is premiering his live production, ZOMBIES ACTUALLY…AN UNDEAD MUSICAL, at the Margery Opera House for the New Orleans Fringe Festival. The comedic play follows Curtis, an outcast at a Texas high school, who reinvents himself when turned into a zombie.

David, who has performed his musical stand-up comedy all over the world, has also written for  the sketch show ‘A Political Party!’ and ESPN’s ‘Mayne Street,’ co-wrote the musical comedy ‘God Loves My People Best’ and wrote and composed the award-winning ‘Fantasy Football: The Musical?’

Find out more about David’s show at the New Orleans Fringe Festival, HERE, and check out David’s bio at Art.Party.Theater.Company.

Glowing Reviews for Gina Gionfriddo's 'Becky Shaw' in London

RMG client GINA GIONFRIDDO’s rich comedy “Becky Shaw” is garnering spectacular reviews in it’s London run.  Please check out this particular column from Michael Billington of The Guardian.

The Guardian, Friday 21 January 2011

The Almeida has a strong track-record in producing American plays. And it was of one of its favoured sons, Neil LaBute, that I was reminded watching this astute, acerbic and richly funny comedy by Gina Gionfriddo. Like LaBute, Gionfriddo deals with power and manipulation. But what she brings to a familiar dramatic theme is a surprising moral ambiguity.

The action, much of it set round Rhode Island, hinges on an ill-starred blind date initiated by the newlywed Andrew and Suzanna. He has taken pity on the luckless 35-year-old Becky who works as a temp in his office: she feels a similar concern for the partner-free Max, a financial whiz-kid reared by her own family. But matchmakers, as we know, often get their fingers burned and the dinner date between Becky and Max has disastrous repercussions for all concerned. It drives a wedge between the well-intentioned Andrew and his young wife and leads to recriminations between the over-intense Becky and the emotionally detached Max.

In the course of the play Jane Austen is invoked; and, although Gionfriddo works within a small compass, she has clearly studied the great novelist’s ability to shift the moral perspective. At first, we take Becky at her own evaluation as one of life’s walking wounded; but, as the action progresses, we begin to see that she exercises the tyranny of the weak. And almost the reverse process happens with Max. Initially, we mark him down as a heartless smart-ass: learning, for instance, that his prospective date is lost because she has no mobile phone, he inquires “Is she Amish?” But, under Max’s brutally wisecracking exterior, lurks a damaged soul. Ultimately, the question of who is manipulating whom remains tantalisingly unresolved.

While the writing is densely textured, much of the pleasure lies in the expert timing of the production by Peter DuBois. David Wilson Barnes, who played Max both in Louisville and Off-Broadway, brings to it something of the deadpan wit and dry insouciance we associate with Kevin Spacey; yet he also hints at the loneliness of a man terrified of emotional intimacy. Daisy Haggard also blissfully embodies the neurotic neediness of the eponymous heroine: nothing in the evening is better than the look of shy triumph that steals over her features when she says something that elicits universal approbation. And, in a play in which everyone is psychologically flawed, Anna Madeley beautifully hints at Suzanna’s quiet desperation while Vincent Montuel shows that her husband’s seeming goodness conceals a certain sappiness. But this is part of the charm of a play that explores, with cultivated panache, the fact that virtue and vice are, in the end, strictly relative values.

  • guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media Limited 2011

ROCK OF AGES’ Kristin Hanggi Holds CREATIVE Gym Seminar

hanggi1Tony nominated director & writer Kristin Hanggi will hold a teleseminar and classes in Los Angeles entitled, Introduction to The Creative Gym: An Artist’s Process. Is there an idea that’s pulling at your heart? Something that’s calling you – but you’re stuck getting it out? After years of working with writers, Kristin developed a specific system for getting your story idea out of your head and onto the page. She’s identified The Common places that writers get stuck and can show you how to break through your own obstacles in order to finish your projects. Since 2007, this proven process has resulted in sold screenplays, published books, produced theater pieces and optioned TV shows.

“Writing an entire screenplay, play, or novel doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Actually, it wants to be fun. I love David Lynch’s analogy that ‘ideas aren’t ours, but we catch them like fish.’ I believe that as writers, as artists, we must learn to be open so that we can receive and birth the ideas that want to come through us.”  –Kristin Hanggi
Read more @ losangeles.broadwayworld.com

Bonnie & Clyde Headed to Broadway, Stopover in Sarasota

bon4The new Frank Wildhorn musical Bonnie & Clyde, which premiered at La Jolla Playhouse in 2009, will be seen at Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, FL, in November, prior to Broadway.

The musical about the Depression-era American outlaws has music by Frank Wildhorn (Jekyll & Hyde, The Scarlet Pimpernel), lyrics by Tony Award winner Don Black (Sunset Boulevard, Song and Dance), book by RMG’s own Ivan Menchell (The Cemetery Club, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang) and direction and musical staging by Jeff Calhoun (Deaf West’s Big River, Broadway’s Grease!).

For the full article recently published on Playbill.com – CLICK HERE

Check out client Matt Cavenaugh!

Beverly_Hills_Lifestyle_winter_2010_74
I expected Matt Cavenaugh to be an eccentric, loud, animated person who exuded “Broadway.” Instead I learned he is humble, eager to share his passions, and easy to talk with. I wanted to know more about this man who is portraying the legendary role of Tony in the Broadway revival of the hit 1957 musical “West Side Story.”
BHL: Playing the prestigious role of Tony in “West Side Story” is a huge accomplishment for any actor. What has this role meant for you?
MATT: It has been an enormous accomplishment. The role of Tony and the show “West Side Story” are what inspired me to get involved in theatre in the first place. My mom dragged me to a production of “West Side Story” at my high school the year before I attended there. I wasn’t really interested in going, but she talked me into it. As it happens, I was blown away by the power of the story, by the music. I remember thinking, “I want to be up there. I want to be doing that.” It really was an “A-hah!” moment in my life. So, it is a great full-circle experience to now be playing the role on Broadway.
It’s a bit of an understatement to say that this has been a very full and busy time in my life. After our last production, I will have spent more than a year playing this character.
It has definitely been the most challenging experience I have had professionally. It is a lot to take on vocally, physically, and especially emotionally. It has certainly been a real honor to play Tony. Both the role and the show are so beloved by a very passionate audience.
BHL: Now that you have the coveted role of Tony under your belt, what are some of your personal goals?
MATT: You know, it’s funny. As I was graduating college, one of our professors had us write down where we see ourselves in five years. I didn’t write that I wanted to be famous. I simply wrote that I wanted to be established in the theatre, television, and film. Now, I’m not as established in television and film as I would like, but I am proud of the work I have done in the theatre and the mark I am starting to make. I have been very blessed. As I grow older, my goals evolve. I have a longing to not only be an actor but also to be a director. I want to create.
Personally, I want to be a good husband. I want to be a good father if I am so lucky to have that opportunity. I want to be someone in this town that people look to and respect – someone the community seeks to help solve problems and lead.
BHL: Aside from having a remarkable voice and impeccable acting skills, what are some of the things you attribute to making you who you are today?
MATT: The easy answer is my family. Yes, my mother and my father, but also the position and role I played in my family. I inherited my father’s drive and resiliency coupled with my mother’s warmth and interpersonal skills. I am also the second oldest of seven children, so I was given a lot of responsibility early on in life.
I also cannot give enough credit to my education. I had a wealth of inspirational teachers from elementary school, to college, and beyond. One in particular is Keith Salter, my high school theatre teacher. How cliché is that? Keith was a great mentor. He challenged me. He believed in me.
He guided me. He also had a real practical approach to the theatre. The theatre was a place to work, not to theorize. Keith was very instrumental during such an impressionable time in my life, and he pointed me in a great direction. He empowered me to travel that road with confidence in my own abilities. I would not have had half of the successes in my life were it not for him.
BHL: Are there any quotes that describe or define who you are?
MATT: At different times in my life I have had different mantras. One year it was “Less talk, more action!” That worked for a time. Maybe it should be, “I’m a deadline kinda guy.” Without one, I’m really pretty worthless.
This was an article that was recently published in Beverly Hills Lifestyle magazine featuring our client Matt Cavenaugh and his wife Jenny Powers.  Matt most recently finished starring on Broadway in West Side Story playing the lead role of Tony.  For more info you can check out his website www.matt-cavenaugh.com Look for Matt to be a contributing writer to the magazine in the future!

Beverly_Hills_Lifestyle_winter_2010_74
I expected Matt Cavenaugh to be an eccentric, loud, animated person who exuded “Broadway.” Instead I learned he is humble, eager to share his passions, and easy to talk with. I wanted to know more about this man who is portraying the legendary role of Tony in the Broadway revival of the hit 1957 musical “West Side Story.”
BHL: Playing the prestigious role of Tony in “West Side Story” is a huge accomplishment for any actor. What has this role meant for you?
MATT: It has been an enormous accomplishment. The role of Tony and the show “West Side Story” are what inspired me to get involved in theatre in the first place. My mom dragged me to a production of “West Side Story” at my high school the year before I attended there. I wasn’t really interested in going, but she talked me into it. As it happens, I was blown away by the power of the story, by the music. I remember thinking, “I want to be up there. I want to be doing that.” It really was an “A-hah!” moment in my life. So, it is a great full-circle experience to now be playing the role on Broadway.
It’s a bit of an understatement to say that this has been a very full and busy time in my life. After our last production, I will have spent more than a year playing this character.
It has definitely been the most challenging experience I have had professionally. It is a lot to take on vocally, physically, and especially emotionally. It has certainly been a real honor to play Tony. Both the role and the show are so beloved by a very passionate audience.
BHL: Now that you have the coveted role of Tony under your belt, what are some of your personal goals?
MATT: You know, it’s funny. As I was graduating college, one of our professors had us write down where we see ourselves in five years. I didn’t write that I wanted to be famous. I simply wrote that I wanted to be established in the theatre, television, and film. Now, I’m not as established in television and film as I would like, but I am proud of the work I have done in the theatre and the mark I am starting to make. I have been very blessed. As I grow older, my goals evolve. I have a longing to not only be an actor but also to be a director. I want to create.
Personally, I want to be a good husband. I want to be a good father if I am so lucky to have that opportunity. I want to be someone in this town that people look to and respect – someone the community seeks to help solve problems and lead.
BHL: Aside from having a remarkable voice and impeccable acting skills, what are some of the things you attribute to making you who you are today?
MATT: The easy answer is my family. Yes, my mother and my father, but also the position and role I played in my family. I inherited my father’s drive and resiliency coupled with my mother’s warmth and interpersonal skills. I am also the second oldest of seven children, so I was given a lot of responsibility early on in life.
I also cannot give enough credit to my education. I had a wealth of inspirational teachers from elementary school, to college, and beyond. One in particular is Keith Salter, my high school theatre teacher. How cliché is that? Keith was a great mentor. He challenged me. He believed in me.
He guided me. He also had a real practical approach to the theatre. The theatre was a place to work, not to theorize. Keith was very instrumental during such an impressionable time in my life, and he pointed me in a great direction. He empowered me to travel that road with confidence in my own abilities. I would not have had half of the successes in my life were it not for him.
BHL: Are there any quotes that describe or define who you are?
MATT: At different times in my life I have had different mantras. One year it was “Less talk, more action!” That worked for a time. Maybe it should be, “I’m a deadline kinda guy.” Without one, I’m really pretty worthless.

Exclusive Peek into Bonnie & Clyde at La Jolla Playhouse

The La Jolla Playhouse, one of California’s Tony Award-winning Regional Theatres concludes its 2009 Season with the World Premiere of Frank Wildhorn’s new musical “Bonnie & Clyde”.  Based on the true life story of the notorious bank robbers turned public enemies and folk heroes, courtesy of the media of the day, Wildhorn, and his lyricist Don Black, along with RMG client Ivan Menchell (Curious George, JONAS, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang), and director Jeff Calhoun bring to life Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker of 1934.

Check out the montage video above and these amazing photos from the first month in La Jolla!

You can buy your tickets right here.

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Marc Kudisch in 'Holiday' Spirit

Denman and Kudisch (right).

Denman and Kudisch (right).

Our client Marc Kudisch (9 to 5, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang) will be starring with Jeffry Denman as The Holiday Guys in December at the Gotham Comedy Club in Manhattan, New York. The Holiday Guys is a “traditional non-traditional” holiday comedy show which will show you the real, hilarious meaning of the holidays.

Marc has received much acclaim, including Tony Award nominations for his roles as Franklin Hart, Jr. in 9 to 5 (2009), Baron Bomburst in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (2005), and Trevor Graydon in Thoroughly Modern Millie (2002) To learn more about Marc, please visit his website here.

Tickets for the show, which start next Monday 12/7, can be bought over the phone by calling (212) 367-9000, or at the Gotham Comedy Club website, which can be found here.

You can read the full story on The Holiday Guys here on Playbill.

RMG Spotlight- Someone to Know: David Ingber

fantasyfootball

Our client David Ingber is having the time of his life with his latest project, Fantasy Football: The Musical?.  After garnering rave reviews during its sold-out run at the New York Musical Theater Festival (www.NYMF.org), the buzz surrounding the show has been tremendous.

Ingber originally got the idea for the musical when two real friends, Bill and Matthew, put together a fantasy football league in 1991.  When David tried to join the league, he was met with an application- asking for a simple paragraph describing why one should be allowed to join.  He promised to write a musical dedicated to the fantasy football culture with the starring characters being Bill and Matthew.  Though he failed to enter the league, he still decided to write the musical to bring the worlds of theater and sports together.

Find out more about David, and check out his own website HERE.


Bonnie & Clyde Coming to La Jolla Playhouse in Nov.

Ivan Menchell's Bonnie & Clyde

RMG client Ivan Menchell, author of the book Bonnie & Clyde, recently attended the first reading of the play in Manhattan, and we were there!  Everything went smoothly, and we can’t wait for it’s debut at La Jolla Playhouse in November.

Check out this article posted last month on Broadwayworld.com:

La Jolla Playhouse announced today the addition of the world-premiere musical Bonnie & Clyde, to its 2009-10 season, replacing The Big Time. This production features music by Frank Wildhorn (Jekyll & Hyde, The Scarlet Pimpernel), lyrics by Tony Award-winner Don Black (Sunset Boulevard, Song and Dance), book by Ivan Menchell (The Cemetery Club, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang), and direction by Jeff Calhoun (Deaf West’s Big River and Pippin, Grease!). Bonnie & Clyde will run November 10 – December 20, 2009 in The Playhouse’s Mandell Weiss Theatre.

Bonnie & Clyde is based on the lives of Depression-era outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, whose notorious exploits captured the country’s imagination. This seductive and cinematic new musical examines how a troubled Texas teen and a love-sick waitress became America’s most infamous couple, with a thrilling new score that combines rockabilly, blues and gospel music.

As previously announced, La Jolla Playhouse’s acclaimed 2008 production of Memphis will transfer to Broadway in October, 2009. Artistic Director Christopher Ashley, who helmed The Playhouse production last year, will direct the New York version as well. Ashley was originally slated to direct the Theatre’s fall production of The Big Time, but due to his new Memphis rehearsal schedule in New York, The Playhouse has chosen the new musical Bonnie & Clyde as its final show of the season.
“We are overjoyed that Memphis has found a home on Broadway,” said La Jolla Playhouse Managing Director Michael S. Rosenberg. “We are confident that Bonnie & Clyde will be a sensational new musical for our audiences and a terrific finale to our 2009/10 season.”

‘The timing of Memphis’ move to Broadway turns out to be wonderfully serendipitous for The Playhouse, as it allows us to bring our audiences the stunning new musical Bonnie & Clyde,’ noted Ashley. “From the creative dream team of Frank Wildhorn, Don Black, Ivan Menchell and Jeff Calhoun, this theatrical gem gives audiences a fresh look at the now-mythical tale of one of the most infamous couples in history.”

Subscriptions to La Jolla Playhouse’s 2009/2010 season are available by calling (858) 550-1010 or by visiting lajollaplayhouse.org.

Tony Nominations Out: Kristin Hanggi and Marc Kudisch Get the Nods

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Clients Kristin Hanggi (Best Direction of a Musical, Rock of Ages) and Marc Kudisch (Best Featured Actor in a Musical, 9 to 5: The Musical) both received well-deserved Tony nominations this morning.  We could not be more excited for Kristin and Marc for all their accomplishments!

Rock of Ages received 5 nominations total, including Best Musical.  9 to 5: The Musical was right behind Rock with 4 nominations of its own, including Allison Janney, Best Leading Actress in a Musical, and Dolly Parton for Best Original Score.

You can see the full list of nominees and other Tony news here.

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